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What to expect when Mom has Alzheimer’s

Prepare for your loved one's Alzheimer's
4.9
4.9/5
(6 reviews)
29 students
Created by

9.4

CourseMarks Score®

8.8

Freshness

10.0

Feedback

8.9

Content

Platform: Udemy
Video: 1h 37m
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

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Detailed Analysis

CourseMarks Score®

9.4 / 10

CourseMarks Score® helps students to find the best classes. We aggregate 18 factors, including freshness, student feedback and content diversity.

Freshness Score

8.8 / 10
This course was last updated on 5/2021.

Course content can become outdated quite quickly. After analysing 71,530 courses, we found that the highest rated courses are updated every year. If a course has not been updated for more than 2 years, you should carefully evaluate the course before enrolling.

Student Feedback

10.0 / 10
We analyzed factors such as the rating (4.9/5) and the ratio between the number of reviews and the number of students, which is a great signal of student commitment.

New courses are hard to evaluate because there are no or just a few student ratings, but Student Feedback Score helps you find great courses even with fewer reviews.

Content Score

8.9 / 10
Video Score: 7.8 / 10
The course includes 1h 37m video content. Courses with more videos usually have a higher average rating. We have found that the sweet spot is 16 hours of video, which is long enough to teach a topic comprehensively, but not overwhelming. Courses over 16 hours of video gets the maximum score.
The average video length is 2 hours 10 minutes of 290 Parenting courses on Udemy.
Detail Score: 9.5 / 10

The top online course contains a detailed description of the course, what you will learn and also a detailed description about the instructor.

Extra Content Score: 9.5 / 10

Tests, exercises, articles and other resources help students to better understand and deepen their understanding of the topic.

This course contains:

0 article.
4 resources.
0 exercise.
0 test.

Table of contents

Description

This course guides adult children of people living with Alzheimer’s through the early, moderate and late stages of the disease.
Course modules average three minutes in length. That makes them perfect for busy professionals to consume 24×7, whenever it’s most convenient.
The course is taught by Barbara Ivey, whose mother had early onset Alzheimer’s and whose father cared for her mom. Barbara helps you prepare for the impact of Alzheimer’s on the person living with the disease, the person in the home caring for them, and the adult child(ren) – especially those who live far away.
Alzheimer’s is going to change your loved one’s cognitive and physical functions, and their emotions. Rather than being caught by surprise again and again, set aside a few minutes a week to prepare now. Be calmer and healthier during your family’s journey, and better able to make sound decisions along the way.
Topics include:
· Early-stage Alzheimer’s
· Moderate stage Alzheimer’s
· Late-stage Alzheimer’s
· Mom’s changing abilities.
· Why a safe home matters.
· How Mom communicates through her behavior.
· Why you still need to visit Mom throughout her Alzheimer’s.
· Critical legal discussions: medical, financial, estate.
· How to arrange for caregiving breaks for Dad.
· Why and how to have family care meetings.
· Why you want to draw Mom’s Care Map.
· How to ask for help, and what makes people say ‘yes’.
· Why there’s a ripple effect from lifting the caregiver’s mood.
· Why it matters to support Mom’s creative self-expression.
· How to be Mom’s advocate.
· Creating care posters for Mom’s room. And more…

From your friend on the Alzheimer’s journey – a daughter who’s been there –
Barbara Ivey

You will learn

✓ How Alzheimer’s will impact the person living with the disease.
✓ How Alzheimer’s will impact the person living in the home and caring for the person with the disease.
✓ How Alzheimer’s will impact the adult child(ren) of the person living with the disease.
✓ How to build a family care team for a parent living with Alzheimer’s.
✓ How to provide the care your parent will need during Alzheimer’s disease.
✓ How to survive the emotional experience of Alzheimer’s.
✓ How to survive the changes in family dynamics that come with Alzheimer’s.
✓ The importance of accepting an Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

Requirements

• No

This course is for

• Adult children who have a parent living with Alzheimer’s.

How much does the What to expect when Mom has Alzheimer's course cost? Is it worth it?

The course costs $14.99. And currently there is a 25% discount on the original price of the course, which was $59. So you save $44 if you enroll the course now.
The average price is $21.1 of 290 Parenting courses. So this course is 29% cheaper than the average Parenting course on Udemy.

Does the What to expect when Mom has Alzheimer's course have a money back guarantee or refund policy?

YES, What to expect when Mom has Alzheimer’s has a 30-day money back guarantee. The 30-day refund policy is designed to allow students to study without risk.

Are there any SCHOLARSHIPS for this course?

Currently we could not find a scholarship for the What to expect when Mom has Alzheimer's course, but there is a $44 discount from the original price ($59). So the current price is just $14.99.

Who is the instructor? Is Barbara Ivey a SCAM or a TRUSTED instructor?

Barbara Ivey has created 1 courses that got 6 reviews which are generally positive. Barbara Ivey has taught 29 students and received a 4.9 average review out of 6 reviews. Depending on the information available, Barbara Ivey is a TRUSTED instructor.
Certified Dementia Practitioner & Alzheimer’s Kid
I’m still surprised by the ways Alzheimer’s has changed my life.
When Mom was diagnosed, I was a researcher at Microsoft with a dream to open my own consulting practice. I imagined was that whatever Mom might need during Alzheimer’s, Dad would certainly be able to provide.
At the beginning, I was right. Then I noticed Dad begin to change. Dad would call frustrated beyond words after a morning hunt for Mom’s glasses. Dad would hit the ceiling when Mom failed to complete a chore.
Mom’s forgetfulness was normal for Alzheimer’s. But what was happening with Dad? Dad was edgy and seemed on the verge of burning out. He was my most valuable player and he was showing cracks. Was there a way that I could help? Could I lighten Dad’s load even though I lived two hours away?
Back then when I searched the internet for Alzheimer’s, all there was were sad statistics. That and resources labelled as “for caregivers”. I remember thinking, “Whatever I might be as an adult child, I was NOT Mom’s caregiver. DAD was Mom’s caregiver.” I quickly concluded that these resources were for someone other than me.
Only later did I realize that I was indeed a caregiver, and that they were indeed for me. While Dad cared for Mom, I cared for Dad.
My channels of communication with Mom and Dad narrowed when Mom’s feelings began to be hurt by stories Dad would share on the phone. I heard less and less about what was happening with them. That’s when I made a point to visit Mom and Dad more often. I wanted to see what was happening firsthand.
Every visit I saw something so shocking it set off alarm bells in my head. Mom dispensing her own medicines. Mom changing her clothes four times before dinner each night. Mom’s lack of interest in watching TV, her favorite pastime. Mom eating all the food on her dinner plate, then Dad’s plate then on the table.
Dad yelling at Mom until he was red in the face for a chore she had yet to complete. Dad sending Mom out for a walk on her own. Dad locking Mom in the sunroom when he went outside to mow the lawn.
It took until after Mom had passed for me to understand what was universal about these situations. How much effort it takes family members to accept the realities of Alzheimer’s. How common it is for caregivers to burn out. What effort it takes for a caregiver to allow someone else to care for the person they love. How caregivers need as much love as the person who is living with Alzheimer’s and yet are often yet to be aware of their situation to ask for it. How there are many roles that adult children can play in their parents’ Alzheimer’s, even when they live out of town. How much adult children, caregivers and people living with Alzheimer’s all need to connect with others on a similar journey for support along the way.
In April 2021 it will be seven years since Alzheimer’s took Mom. During these years I’ve become an Alzheimer’s author, a Certified Dementia Practitioner (CDP), and a Certified Community Educator for the Alzheimer’s Association. Through it all, my passion remains the same – to inspire caregivers and their adult children to provide the most sustainable dementia care possible for the people they love.
I hope this course makes you feel like you have a friend on your Alzheimer’s journey.
Browse all courses by on Coursemarks.

9.4

CourseMarks Score®

8.8

Freshness

10.0

Feedback

8.9

Content

Platform: Udemy
Video: 1h 37m
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

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