Disclosure: when you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Think Again I: How to Understand Arguments

In this course, you will learn what an argument is. The definition of argument will enable you to identify when speakers are giving arguments and when they a...
4.6
4.6/5
(2,568 reviews)
271,275 students
Created by

8.7

CourseMarks Score®

N/A

Freshness

8.3

Feedback

8.7

Content

Platform: Coursera
Video: 6h 26m
Language: English

Table of contents

Description

In this course, you will learn what an argument is. The definition of argument will enable you to identify when speakers are giving arguments and when they are not. Next, you will learn how to break an argument into its essential parts, how to put them in order to reveal their connections, and how to fill in gaps in an argument by adding suppressed premises. By the end of this course, you will be better able to understand and appreciate arguments that you and other people present.

Suggested Readings:
Students who want more detailed explanations or additional exercises or who want to explore these topics in more depth should consult Understanding Arguments: An Introduction to Informal Logic, Ninth Edition, Concise, Chapters 1-5, by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Robert Fogelin.

Course Format:
Each week will be divided into multiple video segments that can be viewed separately or in groups. There will be short ungraded quizzes after each segment (to check comprehension) and a longer graded quiz at the end of the course.

You will learn

Requirements

There is no prerequisite, anyone can begin this course.. This course is also great for beginners without any Personal Development knowledge.

This course is for

This course is suitable for beginners.
Philosophy
Duke University
Walter Sinnott-Armstrong is Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics in the Philosophy Department and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University and Core Faculty in the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. He has served as vice-chair of the Board of Officers of the American Philosophical Association and co-director of the MacArthur Project on Law and Neuroscience. He has published books on moral theory, philosophy of religion, theory of knowledge, and informal logic. His current research focuses on ways that psychology and neuroscience can illuminate moral beliefs and moral responsibility. He has regularly taught a course on reasoning for three decades.
Platform: Coursera
Video: 6h 26m
Language: English

Students are also interested in