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Statistics, Probability, and Cognitive Bias: An Introduction

The final section will include a bonus taster session of my next course looking at prediction and forecasting; exploring why predictions fail, how they can succeed, and if perfect prediction will ever be possible
1
1/5
(1 reviews)
6 students
Created by Economics for a Better World

6.5

CourseMarks Score®

9.4

Freshness

2.0

Feedback

7.6

Content

Platform: Simpliv Learning
Price: $12.99
Video: 3h19m
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

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CourseMarks Score®

6.5 / 10

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Freshness Score

9.4 / 10
This course was last updated on 08/2020.

Course content can become outdated quite quickly. After analysing 71,530 courses, we found that the highest rated courses are updated every year. If a course has not been updated for more than 2 years, you should carefully evaluate the course before enrolling.

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2.0 / 10
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Content Score

7.6 / 10
Video Score: 7.5 / 10
The course includes 3h19m video content. Courses with more videos usually have a higher average rating. We have found that the sweet spot is 16 hours of video, which is long enough to teach a topic comprehensively, but not overwhelming. Courses over 16 hours of video gets the maximum score.
Detail Score: 9.8 / 10

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Extra Content Score: 5.5 / 10

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Table of contents

Description

Do you want to see the world more clearly? Learn to think like a statistician and question the numbers all around you? Make better decisions at work, when investing, and in life? Then you are in the right place.

This course is not a regular introduction to statistics. There will be very little math so you won’t be asked to complete lots of mathematical problem sets. The focus of the course will be on the intuition and practical application of statistics in making better decisions and judgments. We will explore the fundamental ideas and concepts of statistics but with with everyday examples, answering questions such as: if correlation does not equal causation, then what does? have humans really wiped out 60 percent of animals? and do 9 out of 10 dentists actually recommend this toothpaste?

You will learn how not to be fooled by data visualizations, and how an understanding of probability can change the way you view everything from prosecuting criminals to financial crises.

The course has two sections diving into the world of cognitive bias and the work of Hans Rosling on Factfulness thinking. Our inherent mental biases can affect the way we perceive and interact with the statistics we encounter every day; whether in the news, on social media, or in advertisements. The goal of this section is to learn how to spot these logical fallacies so we can keep them at bay and interpret the world around us more objectively.

In the penultimate section, we shall encounter the tricky world of inference, causation, and the trusty work-horse of statistics; regression analysis. This section will explore everything from buying apples, to p-hacking, and to what caused physician John Ioannidis to proclaim that “most published research findings are false”.

The final section will include a bonus taster session of my next course looking at prediction and forecasting; exploring why predictions fail, how they can succeed, and if perfect prediction will ever be possible (or indeed desirable).

With a world of information now at our fingertips, being able to think statistically is an essential skill for all those living in the 21st century. Indeed as Herbert George Wells said, “statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write” – and that day has come.

Basic knowledge
No prerequisites other than a willingness to learn, challenge, and critique!

Requirements

• No prerequisites other than a willingness to learn, challenge, and critique!

You will learn

What you will learn
✓ Basic statistics applied to our world, work, and everyday life
✓ Basic probability applied to our world, work, and everyday life – including Bayes’ theorem
✓ New insights from behavioral economics, specifically how our mental biases can lead to misinterpreting statistics
✓ The ability to make more informed decisions
✓ The ability to think critically about statistics
✓ A clearer, global worldview

This course is for

• Everybody! an understanding of basic statistics is essential for everyone living in the 21st century. However, those interested in analytical subjects might be particularly interested in this course!

How much does the Statistics, Probability, and Cognitive Bias: An Introduction course cost? Is it worth it?

The course costs $12.99. And currently there is a 80% discount on the original price of the course, which was $64.99. So you save $52 if you enroll the course now.

Does the Statistics, Probability, and Cognitive Bias: An Introduction course have a money back guarantee or refund policy?

YES, Statistics, Probability, and Cognitive Bias: An Introduction has a 20-day money back guarantee. The 20-day refund policy is designed to allow students to study without risk.

Are there any SCHOLARSHIPS for this course?

Currently we could not find a scholarship for the Statistics, Probability, and Cognitive Bias: An Introduction course, but there is a $52 discount from the original price ($64.99). So the current price is just $12.99.

Who is the instructor? Is Economics for a Better World a SCAM or a TRUSTED instructor?

Economics for a Better World has created 1 courses that got 1 reviews which are generally positive. Economics for a Better World has taught 6 students and received a 1 average review out of 1 reviews. Depending on the information available, Economics for a Better World is a TRUSTED instructor.

More info about the instructor, Economics for a Better World

Improve your economics, statistics, and academic skills; from absolute beginner to more advanced topics.

Economics for a Better World (EBW) is here to help you improve your understanding of the world, offering courses in a plethora of topics related to studying economics.

EBW believes that the value in studying economics doesn’t come from its advanced and highly mathematical theories, but how it can improve the way you see the world, your reasoning, and decision making. In this spirit, EBW is dedicated to providing courses that are both ‘pluralist’ (learning from a range of perspectives) yet also accessible to non-economists.

Economics can help shed light on topics we all care about: individual behaviour, the role of government, inequality, the environment, and poverty to name a few. It is with this in mind that EBW was born.

Whether you want to learn something new from scratch, want to refresh your memory of something you’ve learned in the past, or simply expand your horizons; you’ve come to the right place.

EBW courses can be watched 24/7 wherever you are, and most are fully downloadable. You can also view them on mobile devices.

All EBW courses have a 30-day money-back guarantee so that you can make sure it’s the right course for you, and get a refund if it’s not!



EBW’s founder, Nik Evans, is an economist with special interests in the environment, development, and statistics. Nik works for the UK’s Government Economic Service (GES) in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). He has also worked with the UK’s Environment Agency and the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Nik has a degree in economics from the University of the West of England and studied briefly and the London School of Economics (LSE).

6.5

CourseMarks Score®

9.4

Freshness

2.0

Feedback

7.6

Content

Platform: Simpliv Learning
Price: $12.99
Video: 3h19m
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

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