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SNAP: Survivors of Narcissistic & Abusive Personalities

An Educational Recovery Series for Survivors, Concerned Loved Ones and Professionals
5.0
5.0/5
(11 reviews)
47 students
Created by

10.0

CourseMarks Score®

10.0

Freshness

10.0

Feedback

9.4

Content

Platform: Udemy
Video: 7h 39m
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

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Detailed Analysis

CourseMarks Score®

10.0 / 10

CourseMarks Score® helps students to find the best classes. We aggregate 18 factors, including freshness, student feedback and content diversity.

Freshness Score

10.0 / 10
This course was last updated on 4/2022.

Course content can become outdated quite quickly. After analysing 71,530 courses, we found that the highest rated courses are updated every year. If a course has not been updated for more than 2 years, you should carefully evaluate the course before enrolling.

Student Feedback

10.0 / 10
We analyzed factors such as the rating (5.0/5) and the ratio between the number of reviews and the number of students, which is a great signal of student commitment.

New courses are hard to evaluate because there are no or just a few student ratings, but Student Feedback Score helps you find great courses even with fewer reviews.

Content Score

9.4 / 10
Video Score: 8.7 / 10
The course includes 7h 39m video content. Courses with more videos usually have a higher average rating. We have found that the sweet spot is 16 hours of video, which is long enough to teach a topic comprehensively, but not overwhelming. Courses over 16 hours of video gets the maximum score.
Detail Score: 10.0 / 10

The top online course contains a detailed description of the course, what you will learn and also a detailed description about the instructor.

Extra Content Score: 9.5 / 10

Tests, exercises, articles and other resources help students to better understand and deepen their understanding of the topic.

This course contains:

0 article.
8 resources.
0 exercise.
0 test.

Table of contents

Description

This series of classes teaches survivors of abuse and concerned loved ones about abusive personalities, targets of abuse, abusive relationships and life in recovery from abuse. SNAP educational program of recovery helps empathic survivors of abuse fine tune and connect with their empathic nature in order to preserve, harness and protect the very things abusers seek to destroy.

Mandy Friedman, LPCC-S, CCDVC, CCTP is a licensed professional clinical counselor, a certified clinical domestic violence counselor and a clinically certified trauma professional. In her private practice, Clermont Mental Health, Mandy specializes in treating survivors of abuse. She is also familiar with the role of addiction and substance abuse in abusive relationships. Mandy’s clients are often in need of trauma-informed care as part of their recovery. This has led her to specialize on the topic of Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). To help her clients, Mandy utilizes mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), motivational interviewing, narrative therapy, psychoeducation and Polyvagal Theory.

A Note from the Instructor:
“My interest in learning about exploitative personalities began as I was trying to make sense of experiences I was having in my personal life. Then, as a mental health counselor, I began connecting dots in therapy sessions as clients worked to overcome painful experiences from their past. A large percentage of clients come to therapy to address anxiety, depression, unhealthy behaviors, difficulty with relationships, problematic patterns of decision making and low self-esteem. As I assessed for instances of trauma in the client’s past, I found that some clients dealing with such symptoms had experienced punctuated trauma at some point in their lives. At the same time, many clients had experienced years of ongoing, normalized abuse and repeated trauma.
Our initial views of trauma within the field of mental health do not include the more common, complex version of trauma. Out of necessity for treating this glaringly obvious issue, professionals are starting to categorize complex trauma even though it has yet to be entered into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM-5). As we get to know our clients, we find that many of them have experienced trauma in the form of a single, punctuated event. These single events would include things like combat, natural disaster, sudden death of a loved one, sexual assault,  witnessing a death or violence, car accidents, loss of a child, severe injury or any perceived near death experience.
In my practice, the majority of trauma presented in session is endured over long periods of time and inflicted by those who were supposed to be sources of love and protection. These clients have an imprint of trauma that was reinforced by repeated traumatization over the course of time. To make matters worse, they also have pronounced experiences of betrayal and abandonment. In addition to the perpetrator, there were other trusted adults who failed to protect and/ or compounded the impact through blame or humiliation of the victim.  This is complex trauma indeed.
The more common sources of trauma do not come at the hands of a stranger. The more common types of trauma do not come swiftly as a freak, chance disaster. Instead, trauma happens when we cross paths with or are born into the lives of toxic, abusive people. This type of trauma happens through sexual assault or molestation usually perpetrated by a trusted adult. Or, a husband or wife who uses psychological warfare to coercively control and manipulate their partner. Complex trauma comes in the form of a narcissistic parent whose child is permanently imprinted with the belief, “I am a failure, I will never be good at anything.” The trauma my clients deal with comes in the form of ongoing verbal, emotional and psychological abuse.
But who inflicted the abuse? Where did this abuse originate? These are the questions I sought to answer. Is the presence of a narcissist or someone with sociopathic traits an unspoken common denominator in this equation? It is common knowledge that abused people abuse people. To answer these questions, I started learning about personalities that inflict abuse. I wasn’t satisfied in knowing how abuse affects humans over the course of their life. I had to understand how the abuse happened in the first place. Who are the abusers? How do they choose their targets? What is it about the abuser that makes the target stay? Since I began developing this area of focus, I’ve been able to help my clients understand “why” these horrible things happened to them and “how” the abuser was able to keep a mental and emotional hold over them. It is important to say that this knowledge is not a “cure” for trauma and does not replace the specific ways we need to process trauma. However, this knowledge does fill in the gaps and answer many questions that plague targets of abuse. Most importantly, it helps them to identify any toxic and unhealthy presences in their current life. They are able to identify and steer away from abusive individuals.
This is empowering for people who feel doomed to “always choose the wrong men/women” or believe that they are “weak” or somehow innately broken. Instead, they see that their most precious human qualities were used against them as weapons. They also see that by denying themselves those qualities, they are allowing the abuse to continue. My program of recovery helps empathic survivors of abuse fine tune and connect with their empathic nature in order to preserve, harness and protect the very things abusers seek to destroy.”

You will learn

✓ Orientation: You will need grounding strategies and other instructions for taking this course successfully. This will inform you as to what you can expect.
✓ Abusive Personalities: Who are the abusers? How did they become abusive? How can you identify them?
✓ Abusive Relationships: How can you tell if a relationship is abusive? Why do people stay in abusive relationships?
✓ Targets of Abuse: Who are abusers drawn to? Why do abusers pick their targets? What do targets of abuse have in common?
✓ Survivors in Recovery: How do you heal from abuse? How can you identify healthy people and healthy relationships?
✓ 8 Stages of Recovery from Narcissistic Abuse: Identify where you are in your journey of recovery?

Requirements

• It is highly recommended that survivors of abuse seek support from reputable and trained professionals who specialize treating survivors of abuse.
• Disclaimer: This content is intended for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for mental health treatment. It is important for survivors of abuse to find mental health professionals who understand trauma and abusive relationships. Please seek support from trusted and trained practitioners. This content is not meant to be used by anyone as diagnostic criteria. Permissions have not been granted for anyone to utilize this material as a source to make allegations about specific individuals. Any online content produced by SNAP: Survivors of Narcissistic & Abusive Personalities, Clermont Mental Health or Mandy Friedman LPCC-S is an educational discussion about narcissism which is a descriptive term for tendencies and behavioral patterns. Individuals with narcissistic features or tendencies do not necessarily meet DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. The terms narcissistic and narcissism are used as descriptions of tendencies and behaviors and are not meant as clinical terms.

This course is for

• This educational recovery series is for survivors, concerned loved ones and professionals.
• Any one who wants to learn about abusive personalities, targets of abuse, abusive relationships and recovery from abuse will benefit from these informative videos.

How much does the SNAP: Survivors of Narcissistic & Abusive Personalities course cost? Is it worth it?

The course costs $14.99. And currently there is a 82% discount on the original price of the course, which was $18. So you save $3 if you enroll the course now.

Does the SNAP: Survivors of Narcissistic & Abusive Personalities course have a money back guarantee or refund policy?

YES, SNAP: Survivors of Narcissistic & Abusive Personalities has a 30-day money back guarantee. The 30-day refund policy is designed to allow students to study without risk.

Are there any SCHOLARSHIPS for this course?

Currently we could not find a scholarship for the SNAP: Survivors of Narcissistic & Abusive Personalities course, but there is a $3 discount from the original price ($18). So the current price is just $14.99.

Who is the instructor? Is Mandy Friedman LPCC-S a SCAM or a TRUSTED instructor?

Mandy Friedman LPCC-S has created 1 courses that got 11 reviews which are generally positive. Mandy Friedman LPCC-S has taught 47 students and received a 5.0 average review out of 11 reviews. Depending on the information available, Mandy Friedman LPCC-S is a TRUSTED instructor.
Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
Mandy Friedman, LPCC-S, CCDVC, CCTP is a licensed professional clinical counselor with a supervisory designation, a certified clinical domestic violence counselor and a clinically certified trauma professional. Mandy is the creator of the educational recovery program SNAP: Survivors of Narcissistic & Abusive Personalities. This program teaches survivors and concerned loved ones about abusive personalities, targets of abuse, abusive relationships and life in recovery from abuse. SNAP educational program of recovery helps empathic survivors of abuse fine tune and connect with their empathic nature in order to preserve, harness and protect the very things abusers seek to destroy. In her private practice, Clermont Mental Health, Mandy are her colleagues specialize in treating survivors of Cluster B personalities. She is also familiar with the role of addiction and substance abuse in abusive relationships. Mandy’s clients are often in need of trauma-informed care as part of their recovery. This has led her to specialize on the topic of Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). To help her clients, Mandy utilizes mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), psychoeducation, motivational interviewing, narrative therapy and Polyvagal Theory as a basis for treatment.

Note from the Author:
“My interest in learning about exploitative personalities began as I was trying to make sense of experiences I was having in my personal life. Then, as a mental health counselor, I began connecting dots in therapy sessions as clients worked to overcome painful experiences from their past. A large percentage of clients come to therapy to address anxiety, depression, unhealthy behaviors, difficulty with relationships, problematic patterns of decision making and low self-esteem. As I assessed for instances of trauma in the client’s past, I found that some clients dealing with such symptoms had experienced punctuated trauma at some point in their lives. At the same time, many clients had experienced years of ongoing, normalized abuse and repeated trauma.
Our initial views of trauma within the field of mental health do not include the more common, complex version of trauma. Out of necessity for treating this glaringly obvious issue, professionals are starting to categorize complex trauma even though it has yet to be entered into the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). As we get to know our clients, we find that many of them have experienced trauma in the form of a punctuated event. These events would include things like combat, natural disaster, sudden death of a loved one, sexual assault, witnessing a death or violence, car accidents, loss of a child, severe injury or any perceived near death experience. In my practice, the majority of trauma presented in session is endured over long periods of time and inflicted by those who were supposed to be sources of love and protection. These clients have an imprint of trauma that was reinforced by repeated traumatization over the course of time. To make matters worse, they also have pronounced experiences of betrayal and abandonment. In addition to the perpetrator, there were other trusted adults who failed to protect and/ or compounded the impact through blame or humiliation of the victim. This is complex trauma indeed.
The more common forms of trauma do not come at the hands of a stranger. The more common types of trauma do not come swiftly as a freak, chance disaster. Instead, trauma happens when we cross paths with or are born into the lives of toxic, abusive people. This type of trauma happens through sexual assault usually perpetrated by a trusted adult. Or, a husband or wife who uses psychological warfare to control and manipulate their partner. Complex trauma comes in the form of a narcissistic parent whose child is permanently imprinted with the belief, “I am a failure, I will never be good at anything.” The trauma my clients deal with comes in the form of ongoing verbal, emotional and psychological abuse.
But who inflicted the abuse? Where did this abuse originate? These are the questions I sought to answer. Is the presence of a narcissist or someone with sociopathic traits an unspoken common denominator in this equation? To answer these questions, I started learning about personalities that inflict abuse. I wasn’t satisfied in knowing how abuse affects humans over the course of their life. I had to understand how the abuse happened in the first place. Who are the abusers? How do they choose their targets? What is it about the abuser that makes the victim stay? Since I began developing this area of focus, I’ve been able to help my clients understand “why” these horrible things happened to them and “how” the abuser was able to keep a mental and emotional hold over them. It is important to say that this knowledge is not a “cure” for trauma and does not replace the specific ways we need to process trauma. However, this knowledge does fill in the gaps and answer many questions that plague the victims of abuse. Most importantly, it helps them to identify any toxic and unhealthy presences in their current life. They are able to identify and steer away from abusive individuals.
This is empowering for people who feel doomed to “always choose the wrong men/women” or believe that they are “weak” or somehow innately broken. Instead, they see that their most precious human qualities were used against them as weapons. They also see that by denying themselves those qualities, they are allowing the abuse to continue. Think back on your own life. Is there an abuser, a narcissist or a sociopath in your story?”

10.0

CourseMarks Score®

10.0

Freshness

10.0

Feedback

9.4

Content

Platform: Udemy
Video: 7h 39m
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

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