Disclosure: when you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Nitrogen Fixation and Plant Genetics MCQ Practice (Bio Tech)

Examination Preparation and Interview questions on Cloning Vectors and Plant Biotechnology MCQ practice (Bio Tech)
4.1
4.1/5
(18 reviews)
1,882 students
Created by

8.1

CourseMarks Score®

7.7

Freshness

7.3

Feedback

8.6

Content

Platform: Udemy
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

Table of contents

Description

Nitrogen fixation is a process by which molecular nitrogen in the air is converted into ammonia (NH3) or related nitrogenous compounds in soil. Atmospheric nitrogen is molecular dinitrogen, a relatively nonreactive molecule that is metabolically useless to all but a few microorganisms. Biological nitrogen fixation converts N2 into ammonia, which is metabolized by most organisms.
Nitrogen fixation is essential to life because fixed inorganic nitrogen compounds are required for the biosynthesis of all nitrogen-containing organic compounds, such as amino acids and proteins, nucleoside triphosphates and nucleic acids. As part of the nitrogen cycle, it is essential for agriculture and the manufacture of fertilizer. It is also, indirectly, relevant to the manufacture of all nitrogen chemical compounds, which includes some explosives, pharmaceuticals, and dyes.
Nitrogen fixation is carried out naturally in soil by microorganisms termed diazotrophs that include bacteria such as Azotobacter and archaea. Some nitrogen-fixing bacteria have symbiotic relationships with plant groups, especially legumes. Looser non-symbiotic relationships between diazotrophs and plants are often referred to as associative, as seen in nitrogen fixation on rice roots. Nitrogen fixation occurs between some termites and fungi. It occurs naturally in the air by means of NOx production by lightning.
All biological nitrogen fixation is effected by enzymes called nitrogenases. These enzymes contain iron, often with a second metal, usually molybdenum but sometimes vanadium

Plant genetics is the study of genes, genetic variation, and heredity specifically in plants. It is generally considered a field of biology and botany, but intersects frequently with many other life sciences and is strongly linked with the study of information systems. Plant genetics is similar in many ways to animal genetics but differs in a few key areas.
The discoverer of genetics was Gregor Mendel, a late 19th-century scientist and Augustinian friar. Mendel studied “trait inheritance”, patterns in the way traits are handed down from parents to offspring. He observed that organisms (most famously pea plants) inherit traits by way of discrete “units of inheritance”. This term, still used today, is a somewhat ambiguous definition of what is referred to as a gene. Much of Mendel’s work with plants still forms the basis for modern plant genetics.
Plants, like all known organisms, use DNA to pass on their traits. Animal genetics often focuses on parentage and lineage, but this can sometimes be difficult in plant genetics due to the fact that plants can, unlike most animals, be self-fertile. Speciation can be easier in many plants due to unique genetic abilities, such as being well adapted to polyploidy. Plants are unique in that they are able to produce energy-dense carbohydrates via photosynthesis, a process which is achieved by use of chloroplasts. Chloroplasts, like the superficially similar mitochondria, possess their own DNA. Chloroplasts thus provide an additional reservoir for genes and genetic diversity, and an extra layer of genetic complexity not found in animals.
The study of plant genetics has major economic impacts: many staple crops are genetically modified to increase yields, confer pest and disease resistance, provide resistance to herbicides, or to increase their nutritional value
These questions will give you basic idea for Examination Preparation and/or interview on Nitrogen Fixation, Photosynthesis and Plant Genetics.
Please Note:
•These questions are only for practice and understanding level of knowledge only. It is not necessary that these questions may or may not appear for examinations and/or interview questions
•In this practice test, because of large amount of questions (around 27 questions) some of questions may have repeated
•I had to put as 70% pass rate because there may also be wrong answers from my side

You will learn

Requirements

This course is for

• Bio Technology
• Nitrogen Fixation and Photosynthesis
• Plant Genetics
Administrator at Lam Research
Manu was born in the year 1986. He completed his diploma in Electronics and Instrumentation Engineering (D.E.I.E.) in the year 2005 at Krishnadeveraya Government Polytechnic. He did his Bachelor of Technology in Electronics and Communication Engineering in the year 2008. He completed Masters in Electrical Engineering in the year 2009 at University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT US. He worked for five years in Information Technology (IT) as a Systems Analyst in United States and has one approved patent from United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and two filed patents. He published many articles including research, policies, reviews, mini-reviews, editorial, short communication and letter to editor in various journals. He is an IEEE Member (Member No: 80399531), member of Golden Key International Honour Society (Member No: 16342916) , Member of Epsilon Pi Tau (Member No: 148800), Member of Sigma Alpha Lambda (Member Id: 206804).
His areas of interest includes but not limited to Electrical Engineering, Nano technology, Nano medicine, Robotics, Quantum Physics, Physics, Electromagnetics.
Browse all courses by on Coursemarks.
Platform: Udemy
Language: English
Next start: On Demand

Students are also interested in